The Moody Blues map spring tour

, Staff

The Moody Blues will return to the road this spring to celebrate the 45th anniversary of its landmark album, Days of Future Passed. The classic rockers will swing through New England for multiple shows on their “The Voyage Continues – Highway 45” tour, including one in Massachusetts. The classic English rockers will visit the Hanover Theatre in Worcester on Friday, April 6. Tickets for the show, which range in price from $71 to $91, are now on sale through the venue’s box office and website.

Released in 1967, Days of Future Passed is the band’s second release and first concept album. It also marked the debut of guitarist Justin Hayward and bassist John Lodge. Days of Future Passed featured hits “Nights in White Satin” and “Tuesday Afternoon”.

The Moody Blues, who are currently reduced to the trio of Graeme Edge, Lodge and Hayward after Ray Thomas retired in 2002, have not released a full-length album since 2003’s December.

Following the show in Worcester, The Moody Blues will perform at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Connecticut on Friday, April 13. Tickets for the show are now on sale through Ticketmaster for $40. Prior to the show, the band will host a special “Storytellers Experience” for a limited group of fans, who can purchase VIP ticket packages through the band’s website.

The Moody Blues will also perform at the Providence Performing Arts Center in Rhode Island on Thursday, April 19. Tickets for the show, which range in price from $45 to $75, are now on sale through the venue’s box office and website.

One Comment

  1. jensenlee says:

    The Moody Blues of 1964’s British Invasion sounded much different than the group that later fused rock and classical music in “Nights in White Satin.” Their first hit “Go Now” was a cover of a little-known R&B track by Bessie Banks. Rockaeology at http://bit.ly/j62HX0 tells how Denny Laine’s vocals and Mike Pinder’s piano made it a rock classic. The Bessie Banks original was produced by Leiber and Stoller, who called it “the most over-looked soul performance of the sixties.”

Leave a Reply